Tag Archives: Navigation

Weather Services: Radar Weather Reports

Out here in the Pacific Northwest, there’s a saying: if you don’t like the weather, wait five minutes. Whether or not your weather changes as fast as ours does, knowing what to expect is still critical to flight safety. Radar helps us track weather nearly in real-time and make visual sense of what to expect […]

CFI Brief: Airman Testing, February Test Roll

It’s the first “Test Roll” of 2016, a process where the FAA implements changes to the FAA Knowledge Exam and announces what’s new and upcoming in airman testing. ASA will incorporate this information in updates to our publications. Some of the more beneficial items to note with February’s Test Roll are outlined below. 1. The FAA […]

Aircraft Systems: Oil Systems

We’re staying warm this week, but we’ll be talking about ways to keep your engine cool. Today’s post is on your aircraft’s engine oil system. Look for follow up Ground School posts in the coming weeks about your engine’s cooling and exhaust systems. And be sure to check out what we’ve already covered in regards […]

Aircraft Systems: Carburetor Ice

Today we’re taking a look at carburetor ice with the Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge. As mentioned earlier, one disadvantage of the float-type carburetor is its icing tendency. Carburetor ice occurs due to the effect of fuel vaporization and the decrease in air pressure in the venturi, which causes a sharp temperature drop in the carburetor. […]

Navigation: Vector Analysis

Today, we’ll put together a few things we’ve learned on the Learn To Fly Blog to introduce a skill every beginning student should develop: thinking in terms of a wind triangle. Check out last week’s posts on magnetic variation and using your E6B Flight Computer to determine magnetic heading, as well as early posts on navigation. […]

Enroute Flight: Magnetic Variation

Plotting a course? Today we’re learning about magnetic variation, with help from Bob Gardner’s The Complete Private Pilot textbook. For flight planning purposes you must recognize that although the lines of latitude and longitude on charts are neatly perpendicular and relate to the True North Pole there is nothing in your airplane that relates to […]

CFI Brief: VOR Service Volumes

VORs are anything but standard. When operating under the guidance of radio navigational aids like a VOR it’s important to understand the restrictions and standard service volumes (SSV) associated with each aid of intended use. VOR standard service volumes are designated in three classes: Terminal (T), Low Altitude (L), and High Altitude (H). Your aeronautical […]

Navigation: VHF Omnidirectional Range (VOR)

We’re devoting this week’s posts to the VOR, a radio navigation system used worldwide by private and commercial pilots. This introduction comes from The Student Pilot’s Flight Manual, by William Kershner. The most useful of the enroute radio navigation aids, other than GPS, is the VHF omnirange, or VOR as it is sometimes called. The VOR frequency […]

Navigation: Aeronautical Charts

This introduction to aeronautical charts comes from the Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge, a foundational text for any student pilot. An aeronautical chart is the road map for a pilot flying under VFR. The chart provides information which allows pilots to track their position and provides available information which enhances safety. The three aeronautical charts […]

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