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Category Archives: IFR

CFI Brief: The Instrument Approach Procedure Chart

On Monday, we learned about the Instrument Landing System and it’s components. Today, I would like to further our discussion and talk about Instrument Approach Procedure Charts. These charts are what depict to pilots how to fly a particular approach into an airport. Many instrument approaches will require the use of an ILS or it’s […]

IFR: The Instrument Landing System (ILS)

Today, we’re featuring an excerpt from The Pilot’s Manual Volume Three: Instrument Flying. In A Pilot’s Accident Review, author John Lowery recommends that “after about 100 hours of flying with a new private certificate it’s important to the new pilot’s safety and longevity to begin training for an instrument rating.” If you’re a private pilot […]

Aircraft Performance: Changing Airspeed in Straight-and-Level Flight

Normal cruise involves setting cruise power, holding cruise altitude, and accepting the airspeed that is achieved, which should be close to the figure published in your Pilot’s Operating Handbook. On occasions, however, there is a need to fly at other than normal cruise airspeed. Today, we’ll discuss the basics of changing speeds in straight-and-level flight […]

Navigation: Basic Radio Principles

A radio wave is an electromagnetic (EM) wave with frequency characteristics that make it useful. The wave travels long distances through space (in or out of the atmosphere) without losing too much strength. An antenna is used to convert electric current into a radio wave so it can travel through space to the receiving antenna, […]

CFI Brief: Unusual Attitude Recoveries

An unusual attitude in Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC) is a very unwelcome experience. Many years ago on a commercial cross country training flight with my instructor, I came very close to putting myself in an upset condition, or unusual attitude as it’s commonly referred to. The close call occurred on the last leg of our […]

CFI Brief: Attitude Instrument Flying

The attitude of an aircraft is controlled by movement around its lateral (pitch), longitudinal (roll), and vertical (yaw) axes. In instrument flying, attitude requirements are determined by correctly interpreting the flight instruments. Instruments are grouped as to how they relate to control, function and aircraft performance. Attitude control is discussed in terms of pitch, bank, […]

IFR: Preparation for Flight

Careful planning for a flight on instruments is important. Besides satisfying normal IFR requirements, an instrument pilot flying in clouds or at night must be conscious of high terrain or obstacles that cannot be seen, and ensure that a safe altitude above them is maintained. You must be aware of the danger of icing (both […]

IFR: Instrument Scanning

This week we’re back with more on IFR. Go back and familiarize yourself with the basics we’ve introduced in earlier introductory posts from this year. Today, we’ll look at instrument scanning techniques. This post features text and images from The Pilot’s Manual Volume 3: Instrument Flying. In instrument conditions, when the natural horizon cannot be […]

IFR: Attitude Flying and Applied Instrument Flying

This week we’re back on the topic of IFR flight. If you’ve missed our previous posts touching on IFR, check out these posts: Regulations: “Minimum” IFR Training IFR: Flight at Mid-Level Altitudes CFI Brief: An Introduction to the Instrument Rating CFI Brief: IFR ATC Clearances We’ve also written extensively on the flight instruments themselves too, […]

CFI Brief: IFR ATC Clearances

Last week, I promised you we would begin to expand upon the topic of IFR, particularly clearances. A clearance is simply an authorization from ATC to fly to an airport or fix via an assigned route and altitude. Any operation in controlled airspace under IFR requires the pilot to first obtain a clearance to do […]

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