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Category Archives: Aerodynamics

Aerodynamics: Power

Today’s post is excerpted from the second edition of our textbook Aerodynamics for Aviators. This book features extensive illustrations and covers everything from the fundamentals of flight to high-speed flight, and includes an excellent compendium of formulae and equations used at all levels of aviation. Aircraft aerodynamics involves the interaction of the four forces: lift, […]

CFI Brief: Flight Controls of a typical Commercial Airliner

This week on the Learn to Fly Blog the theme has been aerodynamics, and rather than stick to Private Pilot level aeronautical information we’ve hit you with some “graduate level” knowledge. Today, I thought it would be interesting to take a look at the primary flight controls of a typical commercial airliner. Looking at the image […]

Aerodynamics: High Speed Flight

Today’s post comes from the Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge (FAA-H-8083-25B). In subsonic aerodynamics, the theory of lift is based upon the forces generated on a body and a moving gas (air) in which it is immersed. At speeds of approximately 260 knots or less, air can be considered incompressible in that, at a fixed […]

Aerodynamics: The Spin

Today on LTFB, we’re featuring an excerpt from The Pilot’s Manual: Ground School (PM-2C) on spins. A spin is a condition of stalled flight in which the airplane follows a spiral descent path. As well as the airplane being in a stalled condition, and yawing, one wing is producing more lift than the other, which […]

CFI Brief: What a Drag!

Drag as it relates to aerodynamics in aviation is just one of those things that must be dealt with and overcome – literally  overcome. When we talk about drag in aviation it is usually discussed in relation to one of the four forces: lift, weight, thrust, and drag. It is the force that acts opposite […]

Aerodynamics: Forces in Climbs and Descents

We’re talking about aerodynamics again this week. Today, an excerpt from the Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge on the forces in climbs and descents. Forces in Climbs For all practical purposes, the wing’s lift in a steady state normal climb is the same as it is in a steady level flight at the same airspeed. […]

CFI Brief: Angle of Attack as it relates to the Lift Coefficient

Monday’s post contained an excerpt from the Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge discussing newly outlined content in regards to Angle of Attack indicators. What I hope you were able to gain from reading the earlier post was the correlation between Angle of Attack and a stall. The Dictionary of Aeronautical Terms defines angle of attack […]

Aerodynamics: Propeller Basics

Back to basics today on the Learn to Fly Blog: your propeller. The aircraft propeller consists of two or more blades and a central hub to which the blades are attached. Each blade of an aircraft propeller is essentially a rotating wing, and thus the blades act like airfoils producing thrust. Today’s post comes from […]

CFI Brief: Torque

Today’s discussion is on torque. An airplane of standard configuration has an insistent tendency to turn to the left. This tendency is called torque, and is a combination of four forces: reactive force, spiraling slipstream, gyroscopic precession, and P-factor. Reactive force is based on Newton’s Law of action and reaction. A propeller rotating in a […]

CFI Brief: Parasite and Induced Drag

Monday’s post touched on the topic of aerodynamics, specifically drag. As you can imagine, drag is an extremely crucial part of flying and also one of the four forces acting on an aircraft in flight (Thrust, Drag, Weight, Lift). Today I want to briefly cover and test your knowledge on the two types of drag: […]

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