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Paul

Paul Hamilton

Pilot, flight instructor, aviation engineer, consultant, writer, video producer and business owner Paul Hamilton is one of aviation’s premier Light Sport Aircraft (LSA) experts. He is one of the first people in the world to receive flight instructor and examiner credentials in the Sport Pilot category. That is not surprising, considering he’s been a LSA pilot and instructor for most of his 35 years of flying.

On any given day, Paul can be found practicing one of a dozen different disciplines, all somehow tying-in with his love of LSA. One day, he might be found shooting, narrating or editing aerial film footage from a trike or LSA airplane to add to his credits of over 40 sport aviation adventure films. The next, he may be consulting for an aircraft manufacturer on performance or testing. And on another day, he may be teaching one or more students how to fly.

Since 1998, Paul has produced full length films published by ASA on Ultralight and Light Sport Aircraft through his company, Adventure Productions, a full service multimedia production company specializing in adventure sport aviation footage. His work captures breathtaking aerial views of natural and developed landscapes, as well as cockpit and aircraft aerials for adventure and training DVD’s.

Early in his career, Paul worked as an engineer for Lear Fan 2100 to develop the business turboprop. Prior to that, he developed and taught a credit course in hang gliding lessons for the athletic department at the University of Nevada Reno (UNR). His alma mater also happens to be UNR, where he received his Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering with an emphasis in Aeronautics.

Paul is a Master Rated Hang Glider Pilot and Advanced Rated Paraglider Pilot with the United States Hang Gliding and Paragliding Association. He is licensed to teach and certify flight students, especially in the Sport category. Additionally, he holds a patent for a variable camber inflatable wing.

Paul lives in Reno, Nevada, is married to Loretta Hamilton and they have a dog named Marilyn.

On Vacation this Summer: Great places to get into the pilot’s seat!

LSA “trike” over Kauaii

LSA “trike” over Kauaii

Kauai, Hawaii… what a great way to get to see a new place from a gorgeous perspective! And if you’re already a flight student, a wonderful way to build hours and try a new aircraft, as well. Read More »

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(Video) Why fly Light Sport Aircraft?

If you’re tight for time and prefer moving pictures over reading text, I’ve produced a quick video to give you a better answer to why you should consider learning to fly Light Sport Aircraft (LSA). It’ll take about a minute to run.

About Paul

Paul Hamilton is recognized as an expert in the Light Sport Aircraft (LSA) category. He is a pilot, flight instructor, aviation engineer, consultant, writer, video producer and business owner. Through his company, Adventure Productions, Paul specializes in teaching and informing people about flying (especially LSA) including students, pilots, instructors, mechanics, engineers and aerodynamicists.

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Maintenance and inspections for Light Sport Aircraft (LSA)

FAA regulations for the maintenance and inspection of Light Sport Aircraft (LSA) are specific about the frequency of inspections and who may perform their maintenance.

Conventional, standard category LSA, such as a Piper J-3 Cub, are maintained the same way as their standard category brothers, such as a Cessna 172. There is no change to the way they have been maintained before the LSA category came along: they receive inspections annually, plus once more for every 100 hours of service if they are used for training or for-hire. The personnel allowed to perform maintenance and inspections are FAA certificated Airframe and Powerplant (A&P) mechanics or an FAA-certified repair station.
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Choosing the right Light Sport Aircraft (LSA) for Yourself

What factors should you consider before buying or learning how to fly a Light Sport Aircraft?

  • Lifestyle. Imagine living your dream. What lifestyle do you want to create for yourself? With so many types of aircraft, you can to choose what you want, what’s best for you.
     
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Where can I fly Light Sport Aircraft (LSA)?

Light Sport Aircraft (LSA) can fly into the same airspace and airports as standard category, general aviation (GA) aircraft. In addition, LSA can operate in many places that standard category (non-LSA) cannot. LSA’s higher performance and slower speeds allow them to fly into smaller fields with shorter takeoff and landing areas.

The higher power-to-weight ratio in modern light sport airplanes—plus the new weight-shift and powered parachute aircraft—opens up more places to safely takeoff and land. You can now literally live the dream of flying into and out of your own property, small fields, beaches and narrow dirt roads.

Where would you like to be flying your LSA? Let me know in the Comment section below.

About Paul

Paul Hamilton is recognized as an expert in the Light Sport Aircraft (LSA) category. He is a pilot, flight instructor, aviation engineer, consultant, writer, video producer and business owner. Through his company, Adventure Productions, Paul specializes in teaching and informing people about flying (especially LSA) including students, pilots, instructors, mechanics, engineers and aerodynamicists.

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Why fly a Light Sport Aircraft (LSA)?

Light Sport Aircraft (LSA), including the fixed wing, conventional airplane style, are some of the most fun and simplest you can fly. Even though you can find faster flying airplanes elsewhere, there are significant reasons you would choose LSA over those others. Even within LSA, there is a wide range of aircraft that fit diverse lifestyles. Read More »

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Which aircraft are considered Light Sport Aircraft (LSA)?

Light Sport Aircraft (LSA) are defined by a set of governing regulations. Among the resulting LSA models, there are three styles that are prevalent: (1) Fixed wing, conventional style (airplanes), (2) Powered Parachutes, and (3) “Trikes” (a.k.a. weight-shift control, as the FAA calls them). Read More »

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What is LSA or Light Sport Aircraft?

In 2004, Light Sport Aircraft (LSA) became a new category the FAA created for aircraft that are simple, easy to fly and inexpensive to own and operate. To fly an LSA, you’ll need a Sport Pilot License, which is much easier to obtain than other more common pilot’s licenses. It does have some limitations, such as only flying during the day and only flying LSA certified aircraft. Soon I will post an article about the requirements for getting your Sport Pilot License. Read on for what constitutes a certified Light Sport Aircraft. Read More »

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Which aircraft is right for me?

From the slow and simple (ultralight) to the complex and fast (jets), there is an airplane “pecking order” that affects your aviation adventure.

Throughout my life, I have learned that there will always be airplanes that can fly higher, faster and farther relative to what I am flying at the time. Pick any plane. I’ll name one that is better by the higher-faster-farther definition.

As you learn to fly, I am certain that you too will be tempted in this same way — it’s perpetuated by the opinions of wise aviation people you will meet. Be aware that it is not necessary to climb the higher-faster-farther ladder if you want to fly. Read More »

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