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Regulations: First Solo Flight

You are able to fly solo when the instructor believes, with some confidence, that you can fly safely with a degree of consistency and you have mastered the presolo maneuvers defined in the regulations. Most important is evidence that you are taking control and responsibility for your own actions—that you are walking on your own two feet. Today’s post comes from the new fifth edition of The Pilot’s Manual: Flight School (PM-1C).

The instructor is looking to see you make corrections for inaccuracies without waiting to be told and without asking for instructions, responding to radio calls without question and saying what you intend to do rather than asking what is next. These are the signs of aviation maturity, of being in command. They are no different from other life skills, just applied at a higher altitude.

First solo is an unforgettable experience that you will remember and treasure all your life. When your instructor tells you to stop after turning off the runway, steps out of the airplane, secures the harness and then leaves you to your first solo flight, you are being paid a big compliment. Your instructor is confident that you can safely complete a solo traffic pattern. You have demonstrated sufficient awareness, skill and consistency to be trusted to take the aircraft up by yourself.

You may feel a little apprehensive (or very confident), but remember that the instructor is trained to judge the right moment to send you solo. Your instructor has a better appreciation of your flying ability than anybody (including you—especially you).

Your instructor will have observed your progress and have assessed your consistency, safety and predictability. It is not the occasional brilliant landing that is looked for, but a series of consistently safe ones. Your instructor will choose the conditions and the traffic so that they are not more demanding than you are used to.

You know instinctively when you are ready to fly solo. In some cases, you may feel you are ready before time. Your instructor knows when the time is right. Trust in that.

Your instructor will also advise the control tower that this is a first solo and the controller will keep a watchful eye open for this new fledgling. The controller will anticipate wind changes and try not to change the active runway while you are flying your first solo traffic pattern.

Presolo Written Exam
Before going solo, you must have passed a written examination administered and graded by the flight instructor who endorses your logbook for solo flight. The written examination will include questions on the applicable Federal Aviation Regulations, and the flight characteristics and operational limits of your airplane. By answering the review questions of each exercise during your training, you will be well prepared for the questions on the flight characteristics and operational limits of your airplane.

These next review questions prepare you for the regulations questions. They direct you into your current copy of the regulations to indicate the level of knowledge you require prior to going solo. Since regulation numbering changes from time to time, the part has been identified—for example, Part 91 and Part 61—but not the individual section, which you can easily find using the table of contents page in your book of regulations.

Application
Fly your first solo traffic pattern in the same manner as you flew the pattern before the instructor stepped out. The usual standards apply to the takeoff, pattern and landing. Follow exactly the same pattern and procedures. Maintain a good lookout, fly a neat pattern, establish a stabilized approach and carry out a normal landing. Be prepared for better performance of the airplane without the weight of your instructor on board. If at any stage you feel uncomfortable, go around. Many students comment on how much better the airplane flies without an instructor and how much quieter it is!

Be in control. Do not be blown with the wind. The tower will try to avoid any interruptions or runway changes while you are airborne but, if there is a need for you to hold overhead the field or to change runway, then take your time, think through the best plan of action, ask for instructions if you are in doubt and then complete a normal pattern and landing.

If an emergency occurs, such as engine failure (and this is an extremely unlikely event), carry out the appropriate emergency procedure that you have been taught. If your radio fails simply complete the pattern and land normally. Be aware of other traffic. You have been taught to go around and it may happen even on your first solo. Simply complete another pattern.

Your flight instructor, when sending you solo, not only considers you competent to fly a pattern with a normal takeoff and landing, but also considers you competent to handle an abnormal situation. One takeoff, one pattern and one landing are the rites of passage to the international community of pilots.
firstsolo

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