Monthly Archives: August 2015

Aircraft Systems: Carburetor Ice

Today we’re taking a look at carburetor ice with the Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge. As mentioned earlier, one disadvantage of the float-type carburetor is its icing tendency. Carburetor ice occurs due to the effect of fuel vaporization and the decrease in air pressure in the venturi, which causes a sharp temperature drop in the carburetor. […]

CFI Brief: Knowledge Test Questions, Stalls & Spins

As the angle of attack is increased (to increase lift), air will no longer flow smoothly over the upper wing surface but instead will become turbulent or “burble” near the trailing edge. A further increase in the angle of attack will cause the turbulent area to expand forward. At an angle of attack of approximately […]

Aerodynamics: Stalls and Spins

Today, we’re going to look at some flight maneuvers from one of our favorite books, the Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge. Critical load factors apply to all flight maneuvers except unaccelerated straight flight where a load factor of 1 G is always present. Certain maneuvers considered in this section are known to involve relatively high load […]

CFI Brief: IMPORTANT Changes to EFAS (Flight Watch)

Earlier this year, all questions relating to Enroute Flight Advisory Service (EFAS) were removed from the knowledge test banks. In addition, the FAA announced that due to user preferences and a shift towards automated services Flight Watch would be eliminated. This caused some immediate concern for those who rely on the services provided by Flight […]

Communication Procedures: Radar Assistance to VFR Aircraft

In many instances, a pilot is required to have contact with ATC. But even when not required, a pilot finds it helpful to request their services. Today, we’re taking a look at radar assistance with words and pictures from the Pilot’s Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge. Primary Radar Radar is a device which provides information on range, […]

CFI Brief: Off-Course Correction

The fundamentals of visual navigation include two main methods as discussed in Monday’s post, pilotage and dead reckoning, each of which should be used in conjunction with the other. Whether flying by means of visual navigation or even by reference to instruments like a VOR it is possible to find yourself in an off-course situation. […]

Navigation: Vector Analysis

Today, we’ll put together a few things we’ve learned on the Learn To Fly Blog to introduce a skill every beginning student should develop: thinking in terms of a wind triangle. Check out last week’s posts on magnetic variation and using your E6B Flight Computer to determine magnetic heading, as well as early posts on navigation. […]

CFI Brief: Enroute questions using the E6B Flight Computer

This week we are going to look at a few questions as they relate to enroute flight, specifically questions that require the use of an E6B. Enroute flight is a popular topic on the FAA knowledge exam and these questions may be very similar to the ones you encounter on your knowledge test. The first […]

Enroute Flight: Magnetic Variation

Plotting a course? Today we’re learning about magnetic variation, with help from Bob Gardner’s The Complete Private Pilot textbook. For flight planning purposes you must recognize that although the lines of latitude and longitude on charts are neatly perpendicular and relate to the True North Pole there is nothing in your airplane that relates to […]

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